jtotheizzoe:

Sounding Off in the Ionosphere
Last night, NASA launched a pair of rockets from the Marshall Islands to paint the upper atmosphere red and white. It was part of a project called EVEX designed to observe special “neutral winds” in the ionosphere.
The ionosphere extends into what we call “outer space”, and is part of Earth’s electromagnetic shield protecting us from solar sterilization. When low-energy sunlight reacts with the upper atmosphere, we see a phenomenon called “airglow” (which you’ll probably recognize from photos like this). When high-energy particles from the solar wind strike the polar upper atmosphere, we get auroras (click here to learn more about those).
Of course, that means that disturbances way up there can block important signals like GPS transmissions, which makes generals and smartphone users rather angry. So to study how odd ionosphere winds can cause glitches, NASA launched two rockets a few minutes apart, each arriving simultaneously at different ionosphere altitudes. They released harmless chemicals that react with the thin air to make brilliant clouds that can be tracked from the ground. 
It also kind of looks like a space ghost-baby is about to be made.
More info at NASA’s website.

jtotheizzoe:

Sounding Off in the Ionosphere

Last night, NASA launched a pair of rockets from the Marshall Islands to paint the upper atmosphere red and white. It was part of a project called EVEX designed to observe special “neutral winds” in the ionosphere.

The ionosphere extends into what we call “outer space”, and is part of Earth’s electromagnetic shield protecting us from solar sterilization. When low-energy sunlight reacts with the upper atmosphere, we see a phenomenon called “airglow” (which you’ll probably recognize from photos like this). When high-energy particles from the solar wind strike the polar upper atmosphere, we get auroras (click here to learn more about those).

Of course, that means that disturbances way up there can block important signals like GPS transmissions, which makes generals and smartphone users rather angry. So to study how odd ionosphere winds can cause glitches, NASA launched two rockets a few minutes apart, each arriving simultaneously at different ionosphere altitudes. They released harmless chemicals that react with the thin air to make brilliant clouds that can be tracked from the ground. 

It also kind of looks like a space ghost-baby is about to be made.

More info at NASA’s website.

(via scinerds)

Nightscapes from Real de Catorce, MéxicoCésar Cantú

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

skeptv:

Know Your Ocean

Even though the ocean covers seventy percent of the Earth’s surface, people tend to know more information about land than the sea. As a result, our understanding of the ocean is often incomplete or full of misconceptions. How well do you know the ocean?

Original video source: http://oceantoday.noaa.gov/knowyourocean/

via NOAA’s National Ocean Service.

(via uafairbanks)

"The game of science is, in principle, without end. He who decides one day that scientific statements do not call for any further test, and that they can be regarded as finally verified, retires from the game."

Karl Popper (via invaderxan)

(via scinerds)

oecologia:


Starry Night (Mount Assiniboine, Canada) by Yan Zhang.

oecologia:

Starry Night (Mount Assiniboine, Canada) by Yan Zhang.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

Our stargazing ends 230516FEB2013

This concludes my tumblog, my thanks to all who followed. I hope it was enjoyed.

7743:

宝石を散りばめた様な。

7743:

宝石を散りばめた様な。

(via hiromitsu)

n-a-s-a:

Center of Merging Galaxy System ESO202-G23 
Credit: ESO 

n-a-s-a:

Center of Merging Galaxy System ESO202-G23 

Credit: ESO 

n-a-s-a:

Comet McNaught Over Chile
Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Guisard 

n-a-s-a:

Comet McNaught Over Chile

Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Guisard 

ikenbot:

Hibernating Stellar Magnet
Astronomers discovered a possible magnetar that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again.
Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion times stronger than that of the Earth. The twisting of magnetic field lines in magnetars give rise to ”starquakes”, which will eventually lead to an intense soft gamma-ray burst.
In the case of the SWIFT source, the optical flares that reached the Earth were probably due to ions ripped out from the surface of the magnetar and gyrating around the field lines.

ikenbot:

Hibernating Stellar Magnet

Astronomers discovered a possible magnetar that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again.

Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion times stronger than that of the Earth. The twisting of magnetic field lines in magnetars give rise to ”starquakes”, which will eventually lead to an intense soft gamma-ray burst.

In the case of the SWIFT source, the optical flares that reached the Earth were probably due to ions ripped out from the surface of the magnetar and gyrating around the field lines.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via scinerds)

sosuperawesome:

Photographer Imagines What World Cities Would Look Like Without Lights

French photographer Thierry Cohen wants to show you what the cities might look like if they went dark on a clear day, and if the photographer focused on bringing out the stars. His project Darkened Cities shows recognizable cityscapes in darkness under the night sky.

To create the images, Cohen first traveled to locations that are untainted by the light pollution of large urban areas, capturing beautiful night shots of the Milky Way floating overhead.

He then combined these photographs with manipulated photographs of various cities (e.g. San Francisco, New York City, Tokyo, Rio de Janerio) to complete the effect.